Wine Tasting 101

NPR’s blog about food and science, The Salt, has an amusing story on wine tasting this week. Part of it is pointing out the actual science in wine tasting, which has recently been a victim of fights on the Internet*. Basically, The Salt’s post focuses on the actual chemicals present in wines and wants to help wine newbies detect by saying where we can find them in other foods. So here’s the quick lowdown

  • Whites aren’t aged in oak as often as reds.
  • Wine aged in American oak picks up more vanillin from the word than wines aged in French oak. Evidently American oaks have a higher concentration of the lactones than the French oaks. (I can’t find an explanation why, but that’s interesting) Vanillin, of course, is the primary chemical responsible for the flavor of vanilla.
  • Cabernet sauvignon and green peppers have the same chemical responsible for their smell. In cabernet, it’s strongest when the grapes aren’t ripe, so smelling green pepper would suggest a low quality wine. Aside: I definitely did not know that. I actually thought it wasn’t bad to have the green pepper scent. I also almost never drink cabernet, so maybe nothing should surprise me.
  • Diacetyl, a chemical commonly used in artificial butter flavorings (but also present in actual butter, potential chemophobes), develops in wines that have undergone a further fermentation process that converts the more sour malic acid (found in green apples) to lactic acid (found in milk).

NPR talks about sniffing all the foods with the same chemicals so you can “follow your nose”, if you will.

We went there.

They even suggest putting the good things in a cheap wine and comparing it’s smell to a more expensive one so you can find the similarities. But maybe I’m just taking the wrong lesson from this article, because I want to spray Pam into a wine glass and add some vanilla flavoring after pouring some Two Buck Chuck in and seeing if that tastes good.

*Just a quick thought on the “wine science wars”. I don’t think wine critics view themselves as scientific arbiters of wine, but I do think they present themselves as having far more precision than the studies suggest they do. Wine blogger Heimoff asks why we never see a headline saying that restaurant reviews are all junk science. Because they don’t claim to be picking up 12 distinct flavors from a single component, unlike a wine reviewer who honestly said a single wine had flavors of “red roses, lavender, geranium, dried hibiscus flowers, cranberry raisins, currant jelly, mango with skins, red plums, cobbler, cinnamon, star anise, blackberry bramble, whole black peppercorn” (perhaps take that review with a grain of salt, since the story sounds like it is coming from an ad almost).

I also think they do have a harder job than the restaurant critics. At a restaurant, you get to examine multiple things: the food, the service, the atmosphere, etc. Heck, even if you only focus on the food, that still leads to several different things to examine, whether that’s multiple courses at a Michelin-rated restaurant or just the multiple ingredients in a sandwich. A wine critic has one thing to look at, and they try to go into intense detail. But humans aren’t meant for analytical chemistry. I think things like this Salt article are perfect. It does show what people can appreciate in a wine and what the industry tries to create.

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