Public Health Involves Science Communication, Too

This tweet has been making the rounds on social media lately.

I actually think the tweet is funny, but I’m really tired with the way media seems to be considering actual policy concerns with it. Cutting off flights would have seriously hampered the Ebola response. But there is in fact a different policy used for traveling to/from regions with vaccine-preventable outbreaks: it is often recommended that you go and get the vaccine before travelling there or if you are from a region with an outbreak, you may be asked to prove you have been immunized. It would be perfectly reasonable for Nigeria and other countries to demand American travellers prove that they are vaccinated against measles as part of obtaining a visa. That policy isn’t possible with diseases without vaccines that we don’t have effective, standard treatments for.

And this has become an increasing concern of mine with so much of the coverage about the measles outbreak. There is actually a well-documented literature about effective science communication, but based on news articles, you wouldn’t know it exists. The idea that science communication is only about filling people’s head with scientific knowledge (the “bucket model”) has been discredited for over 20 years. Treating your audience snarkily like they know nothing (or really, treating your actual, narrow audience like they’re geniuses and everyone in the outgroup like they’re insane) has never really been shown to be effective in technical matters despite half the business model of Mic and Gawker.

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